How do you make a goal specific?

Specific goal

We hear all the time that to improve our chances of reaching our goals, we should write it down.  We tell the same thing to our teens, as we encourage them to start thinking about the future.  But when you write down a goal, how do you know if your goal is specific enough to define what you really want to achieve?

Is any description of a goal good enough to keep you focused, stay motivated, and actually improve your chances of reaching your goals?  The first step is to make sure your goal is specific.

5 SMART Goals Examples for Teens

Disorganized goals

We talk a lot about SMART goals for teens on this website and on our Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn pages because we are big believers in everyone’s ability to improve their chances of success.  But, I also realize that learning how to define each goal as a SMART goal is not so easy if you haven’t had any practice doing that. The very first time I sat down with my own kids to turn their goals into SMART Goals, it took quite a few tries and discussions back and forth to walk them through the process that would give them a “stretch goal” that was also defined in enough detail that they could now work off of their activities list or action plan.  I even looked for examples of SMART goals for teens, and honestly I didn’t really find much to go on.

FREE EBOOK:  5 SIMPLE SKILLS TO MAXIMIZE TEEN PRODUCTIVITY

Claim your own copy of our eBook “5 Simple Skills to Maximize Teen Productivity”.  You can share these valuable ideas with your teen, and help guide them through simple steps to become a master planner!

This book will help you guide your teen to develop new habits that will make it easy to:

  1. Plan ahead
  2. Prioritize efficiently
  3. Master “single-tasking”
  4. Take breaks to improve efficiency
  5. Practice self-reflection

 

Download this guide NOW to prepare your teens to set SMART goals and get more done!

 

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